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Niemand hört den Schrei der Kinder
International 4 Min. 27.12.2021
Exklusiv für Abonnenten
Krieg im Jemen

Niemand hört den Schrei der Kinder

In Sana betrachten Kinder die Schäden des Bombenangriffs der Saudis vom 24. Dezember.
Krieg im Jemen

Niemand hört den Schrei der Kinder

In Sana betrachten Kinder die Schäden des Bombenangriffs der Saudis vom 24. Dezember.
Foto: AFP
International 4 Min. 27.12.2021
Exklusiv für Abonnenten
Krieg im Jemen

Niemand hört den Schrei der Kinder

Der Konflikt zwischen den Huthis und Saudi-Arabien hat sich am Weihnachtswochenende weiter verschärft.
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Die Einnahme der Stadt Marib würde den Huthis die Kontrolle über Öl- und Erdgasfelder sichern – und Tausende in die Flucht treiben.
TOPSHOT - A fighter loyal to Yemen's Saudi-backed government man a position at the el-Juba frontline facing Iran-backed Huthi rebels in the country's northeastern province of Marib, on October 23, 2021. - The Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen said on October 22, it had killed at least 92 Huthi rebels in air strikes on two districts near the strategic city of Marib.
The deaths are the latest among hundreds that the coalition says have been killed in recent fighting around Marib, and come during a second week of reported intense bombing. (Photo by AFP)
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Commune of Ranobe, Amboasary District.

People in the south-east of Madagascar are facing the most acute nutritional and food crisis the region has seen in recent years. MSF began setting up mobile clinics in Amboasary district in late March to screen and treat acute malnutrition in remote villages like those of Ranobe commune, providing ready-to-use therapeutic food and medical care. 

Fanny Taudière, 29, is carrying out her first mission as a doctor with MSF. She is the only doctor on the Ranobe mobile clinic.
Patients with urgent medical issues, but who aren’t included in the nutrition programme, also receive treatment. This is a medical desert, and often there’s no health care available or people can’t afford it. We’re seeing more and more cases of malaria.
All in all, the situation is dire. We have entire families, all of them undernourished, arriving at our mobile clinics. Even when we think we’ve covered an area, people keep coming. They walk here from further and further away and sleep overnight so that they can get treatment.
I remember one patient in particular, a mother who came with her 6-month old baby. Her daughter was suffering from acute severe malnutrition and medical complications. She weighed 3.2 kilos – less than half of what a baby her age should weigh – and her mid upper arm circumference was 75mm, which is tiny. She was also extremely dehydrated. A child in her condition should be hospitalised in an intensive nutritional rehabilitation centre, as outpatient care in our mobile clinic with one consultation every 14 days isn’t enough. But, the centres are a long way from the villages where we work and, when we suggested organising her referral to hospital, her parents refused, which compromised her chances of survival. Transport is provided, but families can’t afford to spend several days away from their villages and activities to live near the centres – food especially is a problem – the time it takes for the treatment. So